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Heroes and Scoundrels

ebook

Beware the pronouncements from medical authorities on high...

The good, the bad, and the ugly of the winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine are explored in these entertaining biographies of the world's most highly recognized scientists. From unapologetic Nazis to dedicated humanitarians who carried out prize-winning research while being resistance fighters or peace activists, these engaging true stories reveal the depths of both the human strength and depravity of the people who forged medical progress in the twentieth century.

In Heroes & Scoundrels (Volume 2 in the Boneheads and Brainiacs series), author and medical historian Moira Dolan, MD, continues her fascinating exploration of Nobel Prize in Medicine winners, focusing on the years 1951–1975. The book's many biographies include the delightful discoveries of a honeybee researcher who persisted through the carpet-bombing of Munich, in-depth reflections on the nature of consciousness from Nobel neuroscientists, and even wild, hard-to-believe self-experimentation in the name of medical progress.

Heroes & Scoundrels also provides readers with an eye-opening "behind the scenes" look at what one Nobel winner described as "a few odd crooks" in the Nobel Prize business of the post-War era, including researchers engaged in medical research dishonesty and fraud, and self-important scientists who leveraged their notoriety to influence public health affairs. The role of Nobel Prize winners is revealed in public debates about everything from water fluoridation to "good genes" and "bad genes." One laureate wondered, "whether mad scientists should really be allowed to police themselves" in light of the lack of informed consent for vaccine research and modified viruses escaping from labs.

As put by another laureate, the "medical priesthood" is due for some critique, and this book will get you thinking.


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Publisher: Linden Publishing

Kindle Book

  • Release date: August 23, 2022

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781610354028
  • Release date: August 23, 2022

EPUB ebook

  • ISBN: 9781610354028
  • File size: 8480 KB
  • Release date: August 23, 2022

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Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

Languages

English

Beware the pronouncements from medical authorities on high...

The good, the bad, and the ugly of the winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine are explored in these entertaining biographies of the world's most highly recognized scientists. From unapologetic Nazis to dedicated humanitarians who carried out prize-winning research while being resistance fighters or peace activists, these engaging true stories reveal the depths of both the human strength and depravity of the people who forged medical progress in the twentieth century.

In Heroes & Scoundrels (Volume 2 in the Boneheads and Brainiacs series), author and medical historian Moira Dolan, MD, continues her fascinating exploration of Nobel Prize in Medicine winners, focusing on the years 1951–1975. The book's many biographies include the delightful discoveries of a honeybee researcher who persisted through the carpet-bombing of Munich, in-depth reflections on the nature of consciousness from Nobel neuroscientists, and even wild, hard-to-believe self-experimentation in the name of medical progress.

Heroes & Scoundrels also provides readers with an eye-opening "behind the scenes" look at what one Nobel winner described as "a few odd crooks" in the Nobel Prize business of the post-War era, including researchers engaged in medical research dishonesty and fraud, and self-important scientists who leveraged their notoriety to influence public health affairs. The role of Nobel Prize winners is revealed in public debates about everything from water fluoridation to "good genes" and "bad genes." One laureate wondered, "whether mad scientists should really be allowed to police themselves" in light of the lack of informed consent for vaccine research and modified viruses escaping from labs.

As put by another laureate, the "medical priesthood" is due for some critique, and this book will get you thinking.


Expand title description text