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The Girls in My Town

ebook

The autobiographical essays in The Girls in My Town create an unforgettable portrait of a family in Los Angeles. Reaching back to her grandmother's childhood and navigating through her own girlhood and on to the present, Angela Morales contemplates moments of loss and longing, truth and beauty, motherhood and daughterhood. She writes about her parents' appliance store and how she escaped from it, the bowling alley that provided refuge, and the strange and beautiful things she sees while riding her bike in the early mornings. She remembers fighting for equal rights for girls as a sixth grader, calling the cops when her parents fought, and listening with her mother to Helen Reddy's "I Am Woman," the soundtrack of her parents' divorce. Poignant, serious, and funny, Morales's book is both a coming-of-age story and an exploration of how a writer discovers her voice.


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Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

Kindle Book

  • Release date: April 1, 2016

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9780826356635
  • Release date: April 1, 2016

EPUB ebook

  • ISBN: 9780826356635
  • File size: 1854 KB
  • Release date: April 1, 2016

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Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

Languages

English

The autobiographical essays in The Girls in My Town create an unforgettable portrait of a family in Los Angeles. Reaching back to her grandmother's childhood and navigating through her own girlhood and on to the present, Angela Morales contemplates moments of loss and longing, truth and beauty, motherhood and daughterhood. She writes about her parents' appliance store and how she escaped from it, the bowling alley that provided refuge, and the strange and beautiful things she sees while riding her bike in the early mornings. She remembers fighting for equal rights for girls as a sixth grader, calling the cops when her parents fought, and listening with her mother to Helen Reddy's "I Am Woman," the soundtrack of her parents' divorce. Poignant, serious, and funny, Morales's book is both a coming-of-age story and an exploration of how a writer discovers her voice.


Expand title description text