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Franchise

ebook

WINNER • 2021 PULITZER PRIZE IN HISTORY The "stunning" (David W. Blight) untold history of how fast food became one of the greatest generators of black wealth in America.

Just as The Color of Law provided a vital understanding of redlining and racial segregation, Marcia Chatelain's Franchise investigates the complex interrelationship between black communities and America's largest, most popular fast food chain. Taking us from the first McDonald's drive-in in San Bernardino to the franchise on Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Missouri, in the summer of 2014, Chatelain shows how fast food is a source of both power—economic and political—and despair for African Americans. As she contends, fast food is, more than ever before, a key battlefield in the fight for racial justice.

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Publisher: Liveright
Awards:

Kindle Book

  • ISBN: 9781631493959
  • Release date: January 7, 2020

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781631493959
  • Release date: January 7, 2020

EPUB ebook

  • ISBN: 9781631493959
  • File size: 6951 KB
  • Release date: January 7, 2020

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Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

Languages

English

WINNER • 2021 PULITZER PRIZE IN HISTORY The "stunning" (David W. Blight) untold history of how fast food became one of the greatest generators of black wealth in America.

Just as The Color of Law provided a vital understanding of redlining and racial segregation, Marcia Chatelain's Franchise investigates the complex interrelationship between black communities and America's largest, most popular fast food chain. Taking us from the first McDonald's drive-in in San Bernardino to the franchise on Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Missouri, in the summer of 2014, Chatelain shows how fast food is a source of both power—economic and political—and despair for African Americans. As she contends, fast food is, more than ever before, a key battlefield in the fight for racial justice.

Expand title description text